6 Tips for Moving Back in With Family

mother and daughter cooking togetherWhen one door closes, another one opens — and it may just be to your childhood home. When you’re closing off a chapter in your life, moving into your parents’ always-open house may just make good financial sense. No matter why you’re moving back in with your family, there are a few things you should consider, including budgeting, boundaries, and handling day-to-day interactions under the fam’s roof. Learn how to navigate your old stomping grounds in new ways with these tips.

1. Contribute financially.

Yes, saving up may be the number one reason you moved back in with your parents. But that doesn’t mean you should expect them to pay for everything. Offer to pay “rent,” pitch in on groceries every other week, or take over additional payments like Netflix or utilities. Chances are they’ll push back at first, but more than likely, they’ll end up appreciating it. Losing a job may have been the final push back into the nest, so pick up something part-time while you’re job searching. Save as much as you can, but don’t abuse your family’s generosity.

2. Do your chores.

Your mom may have done your laundry and made dinner every night when you were a kid, but don’t fall back into that routine. Do your own laundry, and offer to do theirs, too. Keep your room clean and pick up after yourself in shared spaces. Pitch in on the rest of the housekeeping, too, like taking out the trash, unloading the dishwasher, and dusting the furniture. It’s simply part of being a good roommate.

3. Set rules and expectations.

Ask them what “house rules” they have for you. Do they prefer you to take your shoes off by the door or use a coaster on the coffee table? Respect those wishes. You’d probably roll your eyes at the mention of a curfew (after all, you haven’t had one in years!), but while you don’t need to be home by 9 p.m. every night, it’s polite to let them know how late you’ll be out. After all, they’re still your parents and worry when you’re out late, no matter how old you are now. Agree on ground rules for having friends over, too.

Keep as much of your routine intact as possible — moving back in with parents doesn’t mean you have to change your day-to-day or lose your social life; it just means you should respect your parents’ routine and vice versa. It may be helpful to create a written agreement before you move in. It’ll be easy to fall into the parent-child roles, so making things more formal can help them see you more as an adult roommate than an underage dependent.

4. Be patient and talk it out.

Communication is vital in any relationship or living situation — especially adults moving back in with parents — so be sure to talk through things together. Over-communicate about issues when they arise, aim for common ground, and be respectful. Don’t sweat the small stuff, either.

Learn how to deal with irritating habits and let the little annoyances roll off your back. And while you deserve to be respected as an adult, be prepared for unsolicited parental advice! Most of all, be patient with each other. This is a big adjustment for everyone involved.

5. Have a plan.

Avoid moving back in with your family “indefinitely.” Whether you’re trying to save money or get a new job, set your goals and a timeline for reaching them. The plan doesn’t have to be set in stone, but having a general end date will help keep you motivated and focused on the next chapter of your life. Additionally, create a budget and a savings strategy. Bonus: your parents are less likely to pester you with questions if you share your game plan with them from the get-go.

6. Make the most of your time.

Spend quality time with your family while you’re under one roof. Prioritize family meals, tag-team dinner with your dad, take the dog on walks together and stay up late playing your favorite games. If you let the time pass without investing in your relationship, you’ll regret the missed opportunity. Having to move back home can be fun if you let it!

You love your family, but living under the same roof can make it harder for you to express that love! When you’re ready to move out of your parents’ house, find an affordable apartment to call home with ApartmentSearch.

Source: blog.apartmentsearch.com